Ihsahn – Arktis. (2016)

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Author: Gay For Gary Oldman

Artist: Ihsahn

Album: Arktis.

Genre: Extreme Progressive Metal

 

Label: Candlelight Records

 

 

 

When I was in my last year of high-school, I formed a band with a group of friends, centered around progressive extreme metal, mainly in the vein of Opeth. Our lead guitarist was a lover of funeral doom metal; injecting his emotive and far-reaching riffs into our music. Our drummer and bassist were mainly followers of melodic and technical metal, at once keeping us both grounded with melodies but being able to play with that technicality. And I, as rhythm guitarist and part-vocalist, brought the biggest share of my love of black metal into the group. What resulted was a band whose music shifted between many styles whilst adhering to a strict identity, and the very next year Ihsahn released his solo debut The Adversary, elevating him as the peak of my personal musical inspirations.  Continue reading

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Witchsorrow – No Light, Only Fire (2015)

Author: Goldensundown

Band: Witchsorrow

Album: No Light, Only Fire

Label: Candlelight Records

One of the albums I reviewed before this site died off last year was the English trio, Witchsorrow’s debut, self titled album (2010), which was a brooding and crushing doom affair that while tended to drag on in certain places, was a debut that I felt genuinely invoked the dark, morbid imagery and tones of doom metal and certainly fittingly for their band name. Their sophomore effort, God Curse Us, rectified the issues somewhat in 2012 and now, with No Light, Only Fire, Witchsorrow have dropped another offering of brooding, slow doom metal. Continue reading

Sigh – Graveward (2015)

Author: Bloodshot Grub

Artist: Sigh

Album: Graveward

Label: Candlelight Records

This is an album that’s been out for a while, but I was so stunned by it–even having listened to Sigh since I discovered Hail Horror Hail in the late 90’s and having an idea of what to expect–that I had to talk about it. Graveward, album number ten from these Japanese avant-black metal stalwarts, was released all the way back in April to a very lukewarm critical reception. The mixed response is what caused me to leave it on the shelf for so long, and now I find myself both perplexed by the criticism and remorseful for the three months during which this phenomenal album was unjustly absent from my listening rotation. Continue reading